A Chat With an Allergist: Perfect Example Of Thinking Beyond Black and White

A few months back, I wrote about Bioenergetic Intolerance Elimination (BIE). I was a few sessions in and feeling optimistic (that post here). In a quick word to explain, it’s a natural approach to healing allergies. Well, I am now a few months from my last session ever and I have to say, that crazy shit works! I have not had allergy shots since June. Can I get a HALLELUJAH?

This past week, I had a check in appointment with my allergy doctor. I went in with some trepidation and uncertainty as to how to tell him that I essentially cheated on Western medicine? A friend of mine who was going to a Western doctor as well as an Eastern healer for a chronic autoimmune disease had a very unpleasant, discouraging experience telling her Western doctor. (That doctor was insulted and expressed that if she was going to try some alternative medicine, there was no reason for her to see her then. Pretty crappy right?)

When I met with my doctor, he asked how I have been and how my allergies have been.  A bit shyly, I said, “Well actually I’ve been trying this other thing. It’s called BIE.  Bioenergetic Intolerance Elimination.”  He had no clue what that was and promptly googled it on his computer. I explained the concept of it that essentially when we have allergies, it’s an imbalance in our body. So BIE is like acupuncture minus the needles and works to rebalance.  He was both skeptical and intrigued and so the conversation continued. Unlike my friend’s experience with her doctor, mine was as close to the polar opposite as possible, for which I am very grateful.

I was very impressed by him and his reaction. I feel it speaks volumes to how we SHOULD respond in situations where we are presented with something less conventional to what we might be used to.

 

  1. He did not right off the bat give me his professional medical opinion nor  did he denounce me for finding something else that works. He instead asked me a lot of questions. He sought to understand what this “other thing” is and why I turned to that.

 

  1. When I told him of my friend’s experience with her own doctor, he said this (I paraphrase): “It is not a doctor’s job to berate a patient for researching and trying something different. It is a doctor’s job to inform and educate someone so they can make an informed decision.” Amen to that. We have a right to make decisions for ourselves. Our bodies. Our minds. Our choices.

 

  1. My doctor was born to Chinese parents and raised in the US. He’s of course a Western trained doctor so he’s a science guy, yet he has had much exposure to Eastern ways.  He was admittedly conflicted and said, “There is absolutely no science behind BIE, but as an Eastern practice, there is 2000 years of history behind it.” I think this was such a remarkable comment because it shows that he is willing to accept, or at least learn more before criticizing something, even if it is against his fundamental beliefs.

 

  1.      He also acknowledged that I sought a different approach to healing allergies because essentially Western medicine failed me. I would need shots every 3 to 4 weeks which means that every 3 to 4 weeks, I felt shitty. I was like a runny faucet with eyes that itched like crazy. A real treat basically. He acknowledged also that as a doctor, it is frustrating to not be able to find a system that works for a patient. So he completely understood why I would try something different.

 

  1. We joked before I left that I completely caught him off guard and that I rocked his world a little bit. He gave me his card and said he is interested in learning more.  He wants me to send him articles on BIE. His interest may stop at just satisfying the void he has in a lack of knowledge. Or it might be something that he recognizes as another way to treat patients. Who knows.  My point though is we live in a world now where there are many different schools of thought and many different methods. We cannot always keep doing what we were doing because what worked yesterday may not work tomorrow.

 

It takes humility to be able to accept that there are other ways besides your ways that might actually work. It takes a certain maturity to not jump to a conclusion without even investigating and learning. For many of us, we go right to a decision often or right to dismissing something because it is different from what we know or think.

Think of the times that someone comes to you with a pretty big decision or discovery they have made. Think about how intimidating and scary that can be. So think about how unpleasant of an experience that can be if the other person judges right away without even trying to understand.  Not to mention it does nothing for feeling supported or loved and likely, that will be the end of ever discussing that. Why should that matter to you? Here is why (and I know, I will digress a lot).

It is a cycle. When people believe in something or are passionate about something, they WANT to be able to share that and be open about it. Whether it is a new Eastern healing practice or a new business venture or a new hobby. Whatever it is, if there is passion behind it, then that absolutely and completely is a big part of who someone is. To not be able to talk about it out of fear of being judged not only diminishes them as a person, but it can negatively affects relationships.  (Do you know the range of reactions I have gotten when I have told people my ghost stories or how I believe in angels? Think I am going to talk about that again to someone that gives me the she-crazy-look? Hell to the no).

We should all encourage each other to listen and understand our passions, thoughts, methodologies. We do not have to necessarily be a believer in what they believe, but at least for heaven’s sake believe in them. Believe in their character. Believe in their integrity. Believe in their happiness. Believe in wanting to be part of their success.

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