From Airplanes to Harassment, Enough With Acting Entitled

 

The older I get, the more refined I have become at who I let into my world. Energy is a real thing for me and I strive to only be in the presence of nothing but the best, most authentic energy. I am surrounded by people who do great things regularly and who are innately good natured people. So when it comes to the little world in which I live, I feel like as humans, as a species, we are winning.

If you take me out of my little bubble though, I often question if as humans, are we really winning? (and now I sound like Carrie Bradshaw).  Try driving in LA. You will know exactly what I mean. There are so many times that I feel like collectively we are not so evolved and are actually taking steps backwards instead of forwards. Which makes me sad. And I know not one miniscule blog from little ole me will catapult us forwards, but perhaps it will inspire us to act differently or not tolerate the losing behaviors when we see them.

I write this as I am sitting on a BIG 777 flying across country so we all can be home with our loved ones for Thanksgiving. We all should be nothing short of appreciative and kind, right? We are until the boarding process commences. And I admit this is one of my biggest pet peeves ever because I pack extremely efficiently. Nothing makes me more livid than having to check my tiny bag when I see people’s umbrellas, jackets, and laptop bags taking up valuable real estate in the overhead bins. And yes I get it, some people are tall (something that is totally foreign to me) and they need the space under their feet. This is not usually what is going on.

I bring this point up because it reminds me that so many of us just feel entitled. We feel entitled to take up more space than someone else just because we can or boarded first (despite that this is controlled by the airline). We feel entitled to cut someone off on the elevator because they did not step on fast enough. We feel entitled to jump to the front of a line at the grocery store because we just came out of a yoga class and are rushing to pick up our kid up from daycare as soon as we pay for a few items (yes I went there). We feel entitled to that promotion at work because after all, we took every training available and clearly that makes us qualified (when perhaps performance and qualifications are lacking). We feel entitled to say whatever we want because we cannot be bothered to filter what comes out of our mouths even at the expense of (which is not just entitled but seriously bad communication skills).

So yeah… there is a common theme of feeling entitled. And feeling entitled is not winning.

 

I recently saw a post on Facebook from a guy who was essentially making light of all the recent sexual harassment charges in Hollywood. His post was to the effect of how the charges have gotten so out of control, that soon a guy won’t be able to say hi to a girl without that being considered sexual harassment. Ok really dude? Innocently saying “hi” to someone is nowhere near the same as inappropriately soliciting someone for sex or forcing oneself on someone. So yeah, being ignorant and insensitive ­­­­is not winning.

I also do not think it is winning for anyone to post things that objectify woman (the things I have seen about men making references to women being good for cooking and sex only make my skin crawl). I do not think it is winning to post with pride about getting put in Facebook jail for calling someone a faggot on a public page. (And for the record, I unequivocally loathe that word and even typing it makes me feel like a horrible human). I do not think it is winning to praise a president for wanting to ban Muslims and basically anyone who is not White from entering the United States. I do not think it is winning to body shame anyone. I do not think it is winning to bully anyone. Ever.

I do not think being stagnant or complacent is winning either. It might bring contentment and status quo. Perhaps that works for some, but it does not for me. That is why I personally do things like CrossFit and blogging.  CrossFit keeps me challenged (physically and mentally), disciplined, and aware of myself and even those around me. Blogging forces me to be very cognizant of the words I chose. I am a firm believer that in communication, the responsibility of what message is heard is very much that of the person speaking (or writing).

We all have the ability to influence other people. We may not reach as many people as a celebrity or public figure does, but we reach those in our own worlds which is pretty freaking powerful. We can influence others to not be stagnant. We can influence others to not dismiss conflicts or even others’ emotions.

Winning to me is to being so aware of people around us. To me that is the common theme in this blog, in all my seemingly disjointed points. Winning is to realize the power we really do have, albeit small or big, and more importantly not abusing it. Winning is being respectful of others whether it is when you board a plane or how you choose to treat someone else. Winning is a choice. Strive to think about others. Strive to correct those who do not. We need it now more than ever.

 

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Through the Eyes of a Judge: 6 Tips and Tricks for Making Your Next CrossFit Competition Gratifying

 

I had a blast this weekend judging at the BattleGround CrossFit competition in San Pedro (despite the dreadful farmer’s tan I am now sporting).  As a judge (and even a spectator), I got to see the good, the bad and the ugly. I witnessed inspiring moments as well as cringe worthy ones. For those who have competed before or intend to compete for the first time, I want to share them with you. (As a side note, competing is something all of you should consider at some point for the sheer experience of it.  It is like nothing else you will do). When you do compete, I want you to have the best experience doing it. It is not always about winning and for most of you, it is going to be about getting out of your comfort zone to really shock and amaze yourselves.

  1. Have a game plan. This seems obvious, yet not everyone goes into a competition prepared. For most competitions, the movements and workouts are announced before the big day. Prior to the competition, ideally you have time to do a test run or at a minimum, practice the movements. Have a plan for how you want to execute. You may consider planning how you want to break up reps or which movements you want to move faster through to compensate for another movement that you anticipate being harder to push through. For teams you want to know who is doing what to make it as flawless as possible. Athletes tend to feel more prepared and confident going in when they know what their part is.

    I had the honor of judging one of the RX teams as well as a few scaled teams, one in particular which is most memorable.  I was equally impressed by both despite that the RX  team had competed before while the scaled team was competing for the first time.  Both teams stayed in step with their mates, and nobody dominated or took over. They went in assured (even considering they were nervous!) and walked away feeling triumphant. It was beautiful to see.

    On the contrary, I judged a team who was well, to put it bluntly, a hot mess. They had no game plan and their communication was atrocious. They barely knew what the workout was (which is also indicative of a lack of preparation or simply not listening to the organizers go over in detail the workouts prior to the first heat). I have yet to see a team ever (in my times judging as well as competing) where “winging it” worked out well. Granted, competitions are whatever you make of it and for some, they may not care how they get it done as long as they do get it done. I would say though you will enjoy competing more if you feel prepared and have a plan.

 

  1. Communicate with your teammates! I cannot stress this point enough. Of all the teams I judged, the ones that inspired me the most were the ones who communicated well with each other. They had a plan going in and performed like a true team. They knew who was doing what and they did not stumble. They also encouraged each other before and during. They were respectful towards each other and communicated calmly. It really made a difference in how they executed. It also built team camaraderie because they could trust one another.

    Something else that you may not consider until game day is that competitions are quite noisy with music, spectators, announcers, etc. When verbal communication is not an option, you will need to rely on body signals or head nods to communicate to your team. Equally important though is that you need to establish in advance what physical cues to look for. The Hot Mess Team, for example, had none of that. They barely looked at each other which made their transitions sloppy. They lost a bit of time and got many no reps.  They also got to the end of the workout where it was a team relay of a 200 meter run followed by 5 burpees (each person had to do this before the next went). When it came time to do this, they all were standing around not knowing what to do or who was going.  I had to shout, “GO!” before someone finally made a move.

    Lack of communication leads to a higher level of stress and poor output, which is the opposite of what you want when competing. Pay attention to your teammates both verbally and visually. Know when someone needs help or when someone needs a word of encouragement to keep going. Know when to go.

 

  1. Communicate with your judge! Before each heat, I prefer having a moment to talk with the athletes. I like to tell them my counting scheme. For example, trying to count someone else’s double- unders is one of the hardest things to do when judging. There is also no way to count each one out loud and keep up with what rep they are on. I would count out loud by10’s. I would tell the athletes this before they started so that they did not lose focus or worry that I was daydreaming and not counting.  They appreciated this and thanked me for it.

    Some of the teams and individual competitors even told me ahead what their game plan was which makes it easier to judge. For example, the RX team told me that the male was doing all the bar muscle ups and then the female would start on the snatches. This made it more efficient for them (and me) as I knew who to look at for reps (and it did not cost them time waiting on me).

    On the contrary, the Hot Mess Team, as they showed up at the last minute before starting the workout, missed the opportunity to know my game plan in terms of counting. This lead to them asking me a million questions as I was judging which as a judge is absolutely annoying and distracting.  I am pretty sure this cost them extra reps because it took my attention away from counting. Had they communicated with me ahead of time, we also would have been more in sync and they would have a more fluid time competing. (This team was my least favorite to judge… can you tell?)

    Bottom line on this point, just like you should communicate with your teammates, you will want to communicate with your judges.

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  1. ALWAYS set properly before executing. In competitions, nerves (and often inexperience) results in athletes going for a movement, particularly barbell lifts, before even setting properly. And quite often, that leads to failed movements (aka the dreaded NO REP!). If they do manage to hit it, it’s ugggggggly (and cringe worthy as that is typically when injuries happen). One of the workouts in the BattleGrounds was a clean ladder where the teams had 4 minutes to get as many lifts as possible, with each athlete being able to attempt 2 before tagging in the next athlete. I saw athletes running from platform to platform going right into lifts and those were the ones that often failed. Setting up is so key! When I watched the more seasoned athletes, they all took those few extra seconds to set up and they executed beautifully. (Haste makes waste guys!) And I get it, everyone feels the pressure of the clock and every second matters. It is better though to take that extra 3 seconds to set and get that rep than not and fail (which means less points).

 

  1. Stay calm and composed. Similar to setting properly, it is so important to not let your nerves take over. Quite a few of the no reps I had to make were because athletes lost focus, like on double -unders. Those are just a tricky movement to begin with and they are one of the easiest to flub on. One you get out of rhythm it causes frustration (and continual fails). Athletes got in their own heads and instead of taking that extra second to regain composure (much like setting properly on barbell lifts), they would trip themselves up.

    Losing composure also happened when athletes were so determined to go fast, they ended up inadvertently cheating movements (and getting no reps). I even saw athletes start scanning their neighboring competitors to see how far ahead or far behind they are.  This resulted in them losing focus and slowing down.

    It is so important to stay composed and stay focused on what YOU are doing.

 

  1. Give yourselves time to prepare. When the announcer says “athletes in Heat 4, please go to the field”, GO! As awesome and tirelessly as the volunteers work to get everything set up, there will always be unexpected snafus. Sometimes the bars may not have the right weight on them (as sometimes people’s lanes get reassigned at the last minute). There was a team (ok fine, it was the Hot Mess Team) who showed up late and almost did not have the chance to get the right weight for the women’s bar. They were close to having to contemplate snatching 95 pounds instead of 75. Showing up promptly gives athletes a chance to check their equipment, do a few warm ups even, and get themselves situated on the right bar on the rig. For us shorter athletes, we want to ensure we can reach the bar to do pull-ups. Similarly, for the taller athletes, there were cases where they were assigned to a lower bar and had the chance to move to a higher bar for muscle-ups.

    We all are used to working out at our respective boxes which means we are familiar with the equipment and set ups. At competitions, even though you are doing the same movements you have done before, there will be an element of unfamiliarity and discomfort initially. Give yourself time to get to comfortable before you hear that buzzer to start.

 

These are all really easy and practical guidelines to follow when competing. Follow them and you will have a much better experience competing. So go get after it (and let me know how it goes!).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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